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1.  
It is common practice with French-speaking people, that if a couple gets into financial trouble and the wife's parents help them, the couple them assumes the wife's Maiden Name.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
2.  
Genealogy is the search for our ancestors. Family history is the study of the lives they led. A true picture of the family is the result.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
3.  
Genealogy helps you to learn about your family and where you belong in that family.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
4.  
There is no greater legacy for your children and grandchildren than teaching them about the history and lives of their ancestors.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
5.  
Tracing the family medical history helps your children and grandchildren to take preventive measures with their own health.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
6.  
Because each generation doubles the number of ancestors, developing a plan of how you will proceed in your research in absolutely necessary
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
7.  
When you begin your genealogy research, focus on one or two families so you do not become overwhelmed. The other families will be there when you are ready for them.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
8.  
Everyone has a mother and a father. Female and male lines are equally important.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
9.  
A generation equals 22-25 years for a man and 18-23 years for a woman.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
10.  
Organize! organize! organize! You should be able to find information quickly. If your system doesn't work, change it ASAP!
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
11.  
When taking notes use standard size paper, one surname per page, records source(s) so you can find it again and the date and place of your research.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
12.  
Use only accepted abbreviations (no homespun stuff).
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
13.  
Understand the basic terminology.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
14.  
The Pedigree chart is your road map. Begin with yourself. Use maiden names of married women.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
15.  
The Family Group Sheet identifies a couple and their children.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
16.  
Everyone has two family group sheets one as a child with parents and one as a parent with children.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
17.  
A Chronological Profile begins with your ancestor's birth. Fill it in with various life events as you discover them. Eventually, you'll have a picture of your ancestor's life.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
18.  
Surname Sources: The four basic groups from which surnames developed are patronymic,landscape features/place names, action/nicknames and occupational/office names.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
19.  
Think out of the box for surname spelling variations. Surname spelling standardization didn't begin until the early 1900s. Many people were unable to read or write or spell!
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
20.  
The Research Log is very important for keeping a record of the source of every piece of information you collect
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
21.  
An ancestor is a person from whom you are descended. A descendant is a person who is descended from an ancestor. A relative is someone with whom you share a common ancestor but who is not in your direct line.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
22.  
Vital Records include birth, marriage, divorce and death records.
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
23.  
Make a list of all your living relatives when starting your genealogy research. Interview every one of them.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
24.  
When interviewing a relative, etc., be prepared with a list of questions. Use a tape recorder or take very good notes. Respect the person's privacy.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
25.  
When writing to a relative for information, make specific requests, don't ramble! Offer to share your information.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
26.  
Remembering every letter you write is impossible. Use a Correspondence Log!
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
27.  
Death Records can be the least accurate depending upon the knowledge of the person reporting the information
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
28.  
Marriage Records may only be records of weddings. Look for the Application for Marriage which is completed by the bride and groom to be.
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
29.  
Marriage records may be corroborated with church records. Check everything for correctness.
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
30.  
Birth Records are difficult to obtain because they can be used for so many purposes. You may be required to provide proof of relationship and proof of the person's death.
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
31.  
To find a birth date from a death date, subtract the age in years, months and days from the date of death. This is a very close approximation.
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
32.  
When ordering a death, marriage or birth certificate, request a non-certified copy. It contains exactly the same information as the certified copy but is less expensive.
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
33.  
Vital records and event information are more reliable when they are recorded near the time of the happening. The longer the time from the event occurrence that the record is made, the less accurate it may be based on the memory of the person involved.
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
34.  
Church records may include births, christenings, marriages, deaths and burials. Be sure you have the correct church/religious denomination.
[Located in Category: Church Records]
35.  
When ordering a death, marriage or birth certificate, request the long form which will have more information than the short form.
[Located in Category: Vital Records]
36.  
If you're not sure which church your ancestor attended, search the churches closest to home first and then broaden your search in ever-widening circles. Check for cemetery records with the church, Sexton and Funeral Directors.
[Located in Category: Church Records]
37.  
Visit the cemetery and take a picture of the tombstone. Check the obituaries in that time frame.
[Located in Category: Church Records]
38.  
Hometown Records may include newspapers (obituaries, special events, parties, etc.), City Directories (names and occupations of town residents and business information), maps (check boundary changes over time) and town and county histories.
[Located in Category: Hometown Records]
39.  
Direct evidence speaks to the point in question. Indirect evidence gives facts from which you can come to a conclusion.
[Located in Category: Evidence and Documentation]
40.  
Primary evidence is personal testimony or a record created shortly after an event by a person with personal knowledge of the facts.
[Located in Category: Evidence and Documentation]
41.  
Secondary evidence is copies or compiled from other sources written from memory long after the event has occurred.
[Located in Category: Evidence and Documentation]
42.  
Undocumented genealogy is mythology. Remember to document everything you find on your ancestors
[Located in Category: Evidence and Documentation]
43.  
Write down your sources of information. Who/what told you? This is documentation. From this, you will be able to find the source again, if you need to do so.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
44.  
Genealogical citation is not always uniform. Elements include name of the person who created the document, date of the records, form used (county deed book, microfilm, etc.) and where the document can be found again.
[Located in Category: Evidence and Documentation]
45.  
A census is an official county of the population living in the United States on a designated day set at intervals. The census places an ancestor is a specific place at a specific time.
[Located in Category: Census]
46.  
Begin with the most recent census (1930) and work backwards.
[Located in Category: Census]
47.  
The first federal census was taken in 1790 and is taken every 10 years on an established day.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
48.  
A census is closed to the public for 72 years after it is taken.
[Located in Category: Census]
49.  
Before 1790 you can use Tax Lists and other local lists that might have been compiled according to the state you are researching in.
[Located in Category: Census]
50.  
The 1890 census was destroyed but many groups are now gathering other data to fill in this gap
[Located in Category: Census]